Tag Archives: Scheherazade

S is for Scheherazade

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"Scheherazade went on with her story" by Virginia Frances Sterrett. The Arabian Nights, Penn Publishing Company, 1928.

“Scheherazade went on with her story” by Virginia Frances Sterrett from The Arabian Nights, Penn Publishing Company, 1928.

 

 

 

When I first visited a mosque, I suddenly understood Scheherazade—how she had to save not just herself and Dunyazad, but all the women.

Stepping into the women’s room, awkward and barefoot, I felt instantly, abundantly, embraced, as though I’d been longed for and had arrived! The women caressed me, subsumed me, spoke to me in Farsi with desperate affection, re-wrapped my scarf properly, showed me, cued me, clued me, guided my arms, moved my hands, touched hips as we prostrated ourselves to pray.

Aha! This joyous room of women was part of – the heart of – Scheherazade’s own being.

Embrace these volumes of Scheherazade’s magic: a new translation, a student volume, and a “sequel” for puzzle lovers.

 

The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1001 Nights: Volumes 1, 2 & 3 (Penguin Classics), translated by Malcolm Lyons and Ursula Lyons, with an introduction by Robert Irwin.  Penguin, 2010.

McCaughrean, Geraldine, One Thousand and One Arabian Nights (Oxford Story Collections) illustrated by Rosamund Fowler. Oxford University Press, USA, 2000.

Smullyan, Raymond M., The Riddle of Scheherazade: And Other Amazing Puzzles, Ancient and Modern. Knopf, 2012.nightscd

 

 

And now you know where the cover art for my Storytelling World Honors Award-winning CD came from!

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O is for Old Dry Fry

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Virginia Frances Sterrett illustrated Penn Publishing Company's 1928 edition of Arabian Nights.

Virginia Frances Sterrett illustrated Penn Publishing Company’s 1928 edition of Arabian Nights.

 

 

 

Ever’body knows Old Dry Fry! He’s the preacher who choked on a piece of fried chicken and died. Each character who encountered his body tried to hide it to avoid being accused of murder. It’s an hilarious, rollicking tale told in the American south by black and white storytellers alike, and it fits the culture and environment perfectly!

But the tale’s roots outstretch America’s short history, digging back at least a millennium  to Scheherazade’s “Tale of the Hunchback,” and the storyline likely arose centuries before that legendary storyteller’s rendition.

Matter is not created from nothingness, and neither are stories that matter.

Here are some sources that might matter to your readers and listeners:

Johnson, Paul Brett, Old Dry Frye. Scholastic, 2001.

Yolen, Jane, Favorite Folktales from Around the World. Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folktale Library, 1988.

Scheherazade’s Children, edited by Philip F.Kennedy and Marina Warner. New York University Press, 2013.

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“Old Dry Fry” is also on my Storytelling World Honor CD, 1001 Years of 1001 Nights. If your Texas library does not have a copy, send me their address and I will get one to them.