S is for Scheherazade

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"Scheherazade went on with her story" by Virginia Frances Sterrett. The Arabian Nights, Penn Publishing Company, 1928.

“Scheherazade went on with her story” by Virginia Frances Sterrett from The Arabian Nights, Penn Publishing Company, 1928.

 

 

 

When I first visited a mosque, I suddenly understood Scheherazade—how she had to save not just herself and Dunyazad, but all the women.

Stepping into the women’s room, awkward and barefoot, I felt instantly, abundantly, embraced, as though I’d been longed for and had arrived! The women caressed me, subsumed me, spoke to me in Farsi with desperate affection, re-wrapped my scarf properly, showed me, cued me, clued me, guided my arms, moved my hands, touched hips as we prostrated ourselves to pray.

Aha! This joyous room of women was part of – the heart of – Scheherazade’s own being.

Embrace these volumes of Scheherazade’s magic: a new translation, a student volume, and a “sequel” for puzzle lovers.

 

The Arabian Nights: Tales of 1001 Nights: Volumes 1, 2 & 3 (Penguin Classics), translated by Malcolm Lyons and Ursula Lyons, with an introduction by Robert Irwin.  Penguin, 2010.

McCaughrean, Geraldine, One Thousand and One Arabian Nights (Oxford Story Collections) illustrated by Rosamund Fowler. Oxford University Press, USA, 2000.

Smullyan, Raymond M., The Riddle of Scheherazade: And Other Amazing Puzzles, Ancient and Modern. Knopf, 2012.nightscd

 

 

And now you know where the cover art for my Storytelling World Honors Award-winning CD came from!

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