Q is for Queens

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“Ah, we shall soon see that!” said the queen mother, however, she said not a word of what she was going to do . . .  Illustration for “The Princess and the Pea,” by Edward Dulac from the Snow Queen and Other Stories from Hans Christian Andersen, 1911.

“Ah, we shall soon see that!” said the queen mother, however, she said not a word of what she was going to do . . .” Illustration for “The Princess and the Pea,” by Edward Dulac from the Snow Queen and Other Stories from Hans Christian Andersen, 1911.

 

 

Metaphorically speaking–and fairy tales are metaphorical, so let’s do!–Queens are women in midlife.

They have aging issues as they watch their beautiful daughters blossom.

They have princely sons to marry off to a worthy bride—by hook or crook.

They have husbands with midlife crises whom they must nurture or manipulate back into a healthier relationship.

And, suddenly, they have stepdaughters more charming and lovable than their own snooty brats!

So, they behave just like living, breathing human women do in our 40s and 50s.

No snickering, gentlemen! At least not until you’ve read about fairy tale kings!

Have you shelved these queens?

Brothers Grimm, Snow White, illustrated by Camille Rose Garcia. Harper Design, 2012.

“Clever Manka” and “The Lute Player” may be found in . . .
Phelps, Ethel Johnston, Tatterhood and Other Tales. The Feminist Press at CUNY, 1993.

The Princess and the Pea retold by Xanthe Gresham, illustrated by Miss Clara. Barefoot Books, 2013.

3Swans_CDSleeve_v4

 

 

 

“The Lute Player” is also on my CD Ghostly Gals and Spirited Women. If your Texas library does not have a copy, let me know and I’ll see that they get one.

 

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